DTT Joins with Convenience Stores Against Human Trafficking

Looks to provide c-stores with tips to help victims.

DTT has partnered with Convenience Stores Against Trafficking (CSAT), a subsidiary of the non-profit In Our Backyard, which seeks to end human trafficking in the U.S.

DTT is a private-equity backed company that provides the hospitality and c-store industries with managed loss prevention solutions.

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DTT will work closely with Convenience Stores Against Trafficking to raise awareness about trafficking, as well as to provide C-Store Operators with simple tips they can use to encourage victims of trafficking to find help.

These tips include providing information and training to employees, which they can use to spot cases of human trafficking, as well as posting hotlines in Convenience Store bathrooms, which gives victims of trafficking an outlet to find help. DTT will also work with CSAT to encourage operators to use video surveillance to identify and report suspected cases of trafficking.

“C-Store operators are in a unique position to take action against human trafficking, because human traffickers are dependent on the services their stores provide, such as late hours, public restrooms, and ease of access,” said Juliana Williams, the program director for Convenience Stores Against Trafficking. “I’m thrilled that DTT has so readily taken the initiative to help spread awareness of our mission and to put an end to this horrible crime, which can affect anyone, anywhere.”

“I believe that as an industry leader in the field of loss prevention, we have a responsibility to use our product to do good in the community,” said Crista Backo, director of c-store sales at DTT. “Our products are primarily used to protect stores and employees from theft or violent crime, but they also have the potential to do so much more. Human trafficking is a scourge on society, and I’m happy to make a small contribution on behalf of DTT to help put an end to it.”

Nita Belles founded In our Backyard in 2006 when she was exposed to the reality that anyone can be affected by human trafficking. Human trafficking is the second largest and fastest growing crime in the world.